Employee speaking to manager while seated at a table
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About this workbook

This workbook will be your guide throughout the workshop and
follow-up sessions. There are few ways to navigate it: Tap the
arrows on the left and right side of the page, use the navigation
bar on the left, or type the page number in the “Go to page” box.

A few important notes about this workbook:

  • This workbook is stored locally on your computer, so your
    responses are private and only you have access to them

  • Your responses will save even if you close the link

  • During the duration of the program (workshop + follow-up
    sessions), do not clear your cache on your internet browser
    or your responses will be lost

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

What does allyship look like to you? What is it not?

What do you think would make you a stronger ally? What’s preventing that?

What are you nervous or uncomfortable about?

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 4

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TURN YOUR CAMERA BACK ON
WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 5

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Allyship

Allyship is an active and consistent effort
to use your privilege and power to support
and advocate for people with less privilege

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 6

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How to practice allyship in breakout groups

Microphone

Share the mic

Make space for everyone to speak. Step back if you often share first or when
exploring areas where you hold privilege.

Shield with human silhouette on top

Commit to confidentiality

Don’t use other people’s names when sharing stories and keep everything
shared confidential.

Lightbulb

Be mindful of your a-ha moments

When you see something through a new lens, remember that it might be part
of someone else’s day-to-day. Be aware of how your sharing will land for them.

Ear listening

Don’t question others’ experiences

Don’t question or discount the lived experiences of others.

Hands opening forward

Give one another grace

Believe one another’s best intentions and be patient when mistakes are made.

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 6

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BREAKOUT DISCUSSION

Discussion about allyship

Goal: Sharpen your definition of allyship and understand what you and your colleagues
hope to get out of the workshop

Tips for practicing allyship in this space

  • Do not put others on the spot by asking them to share personal stories.

  • If someone does share a story, do not question or invalidate their experience.

Discussion prompts

  • Introduce yourselves if you don’t know one another already

  • Did your definition of allyship change after watching the video? Why or why not?

  • What are you hesitant about coming into this workshop? What do you hope to leave with?

  • Have you seen any examples of impactful allyship in your workplace or life?

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 8

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Privilege

Privilege is the unearned advantage we get
from being part of a dominant group whose
needs have traditionally been prioritized

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 10

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

Privilege exploration

Add a tick  next to the statements that apply to you

1

2

3

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 11

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

4

5

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 12

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TURN YOUR CAMERA BACK ON
WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 13

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BREAKOUT DISCUSSION

Discussion about privilege

Goal: Reflect on areas of privilege that you often take for granted

Tips for practicing allyship in this space

  • Respect privacy—don’t ask others to share their personal experiences.

  • If someone wants to share, create space and don’t question or invalidate what they say.

  • Be particularly mindful of your a-ha moments during this discussion.

Discussion prompts

  • What stood out to you about your own privilege?

  • What’s one area where you hold privilege that you take for granted? What in your life
    might be different without that privilege?

  • What is challenging to you when thinking about your own privilege?

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 14

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Workplace categories

Speech bubbles

Everyday interactions

Calendar

Workplace norms
and expectations

Résumé

Hiring

Star surrounded by laurels

Advancement and
recognition

Dotted line connecting minds of two employees

Mentorship and
sponsorship

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 16

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

Uncover workplace inequities

  • Spend the next 15 minutes individually exploring all five workplace categories
    on pages 18–67.

  • Try to move to a new category every 3 minutes. This will help you make it
    through all five categories, even if you can’t fully explore all the statements in
    each category

  • Scroll to the next page to begin by reading an overview of inequity in
    everyday interactions

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 17

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

Understanding workplace inequities:

Everyday interactions

Speech bubbles

The interactions we have with our colleagues have a big impact on our comfort
and well-being at work. And casual comments, actions, and assumptions that
are rooted in bias (sometimes called ”microaggressions”) can be disrespectful
and a major source of stress for people with traditionally marginalized identities—even
if they’re not intended to be hurtful.6 Workplace microaggressions can be
common occurrences for people with traditionally marginalized identities, and they make
it much harder for employees with less privilege to bring their authentic selves
to work. Women of color, women with disabilities, and LGBTQ+ women are
more likely to experience microaggressions, and these slights add up: women
who experience microaggressions are three times more likely to regularly think
about leaving their job.7

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 18

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

1

Add a tick next to all
of the statements
that apply to you

2

Learn more by clicking
LISTEN TO STORY or
SEE DATA for each
statement you selected

3

Once you’ve
finished, move on to
the next category

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 19

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

I have never heard a colleague make a cruel joke about people like me

Listen to Rima’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”Like many other people of color I've had to work
in places where people made some discriminatory
remarks or things that they maybe thought were jokes
but were pretty offensive related to race or religion. I'll
say three things about what that feels like on the other
end. It makes you feel very misunderstood. It makes you
wonder what the conversations look like when you're not
in the room and when people are maybe in their comfort
zone at home with their families, what conversations
around race or maybe religion look like there.”

”It makes you feel defensive and protective of your
community. It, I would say, hindered my ability to form
deep relationships with those people, because now I

started to feel super defensive about my identities or
my family, or what stereotypes they might believe about
my community and not wanting to get too close to
those people because of how protective I felt about the
community that they were joking about.”

”It also turns you into the person that sometimes
doesn't want to rock the boat. If everybody finds this
joke funny, you don't want to be the colleague who
is angry or ruining everyone else's fun if it seems like
it's lighthearted humor. It just basically puts you in a
position where it's hard to get close to people, but
at the same time, you're the collateral damage at
everyone else's expense or entertainment.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 20

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

My colleagues don’t comment about my culture or religion
in ways that make me feel excluded or demeaned

DID YOU KNOW?

People with certain backgrounds and identities are more likely to encounter
cultural appropriation and insensitive comments at work. For example, Native
American people may hear coworkers and managers use language like
”having a powwow,” ”off the reservation,” ”spirit animal,” or ”low man on the
totem pole.”8 Muslim women often face similar insensitive comments, such
as being asked if they’re allowed to talk to men.9 And Jewish employees
may have to contend with stereotypes and microaggressions around their
religion. In fact, one poll found that 61% of Americans agreed with at least
one antisemitic sentiment.10

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 21

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

No one has ever asked to touch my hair at work

DID YOU KNOW?

This can be a common occurrence for some Black women at work.
Asking to touch a Black woman’s hair is an example of ”hair bias” —the
idea that there’s something exotic, wrong, or unprofessional about a
Black woman’s natural hair. This bias is all too common: in fact, some
U.S. companies still prohibit natural Black hairstyles.11

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 22

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

Coworkers don’t confuse me with others of my race

DID YOU KNOW?

Decades of research show that people often find it harder to differentiate
between people of another race than people of their own race.12 This is called
”own-race bias,” and it’s further complicated by power dynamics: research
shows that people who hold more power, such as senior executives, are less
likely to be mistaken for someone else of the same race.13

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 23

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

Coworkers don’t confuse me with others of my race

Listen to Daisy’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”When I sat on a nonprofit board, I had been in the board for a
couple of months. I noticed that every time that we met as a group,
I would be consistently confused for the only other Latina on the
board. Now, she and I both had short hair, brown skin but that was
about it in terms of what we looked like. Having that not been the
first experience in my career and life when I had been confused
for another Latina, either in the workplace or in groups that I have
been part of, this was an experience that I was accustomed to.”

”It was an experience that no matter the years of feeling it and
seeing it still hurt. It made me feel invisible. It made me feel as
if these individuals that I've worked with closely didn't bother
enough to see me and know me to be able to distinguish me from
a completely different human being. Now, I resolved it, which I was
able to do because I've had years of experience in doing this. This
is not how I did it at the beginning of my career.”

”The way that I resolved it was by talking about it. I would quickly
remind the person. I was like, 'No, I'm not Carmen. I'm Daisy' or 'I

think you meant to say—' and in that moment, there's always this
look of panic and fright. 'Oh my goodness. I'm so sorry.' I also
didn't want to take away the discomfort from that person. I wanted
them to realize that it wasn't comfortable for me to be confused
for somebody else and that it made me feel a different way. I said
it enough times that our chair heard me and heard my colleague,
who by the way was also being confused for me. We were both
having very parallel experiences and we would both laugh at it but
that laughter came with a feeling of hurt really deep in our bellies.
We mentioned it to the chair of the board who really bravely, I
think it was a very courageous move on her part, in one of the
meetings opened up by saying, ‘I hear this has been happening.
I know there's no ill intent but I would just like for all of us to be
more conscious about how we engage and connect with each
other because these are acts of microaggressions that continually
happen to women and men of color.’ I have to say that after that it
never happened again.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 24

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

I rarely hear comments suggesting I’m not dressed professionally enough

DID YOU KNOW?

  • People with traditionally marginalized identities are often held to higher standards when it
    comes to professional attire.

  • Black women can miss out on jobs, promotions, and other opportunities
    because of arbitrary judgments about their appearance.14 To avoid this penalty,
    many Black women say they have to dress more formally than their colleagues
    and spend more money on hair and accessories.15

  • Most Latinas in corporate America also say that they style their hair and makeup
    conservatively (87%) and dress conservatively (84%) in order to fit in at work.16

  • 1 in 5 LGBTQ+ workers has been told or had coworkers imply that they should
    dress in a more feminine or masculine manner.17

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 25

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

People rarely or never call me ‘emotional’ when I express my
opinion at work

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Women in general tend to be criticized as ”emotional” when they express a
    strong point of view, whereas men usually don’t face this kind of judgment.18

  • In addition, research shows that Latinas are often labeled as heated or emotional
    when they are merely speaking without being deferential.19 This is rooted in the
    pervasive stereotype that Latinas are too intense, feisty, and emotional.20

  • Similarly, Black women are more likely to be labeled as angry, even though
    research shows they are no more likely to experience or express anger than
    Americans as a whole.21 These labels have profoundly damaging consequences:
    in one study, when Black women were viewed as angry, they received lower
    ratings and raises than white women viewed the same way.22

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 26

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

I can talk about my personal life without feeling like
I’m coming out or explaining myself

DID YOU KNOW?

  • More than 60% of LGBTQ+ respondents report needing to correct
    colleagues’ assumptions about their personal lives.23 And 35% of LGBTQ+
    employees feel compelled to lie about their personal lives at work.24

  • There’s also a double standard: 70% of straight cisgender workers say ”it is
    unprofessional” to talk about sexual orientation or gender identity at work,25
    but 80% of straight cis people say they talk about social relationships and
    dating in the workplace weekly or daily.26

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 27

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

I don’t often feel othered by the words my colleagues use

DID YOU KNOW?

People with traditionally marginalized identities are more likely to have to contend with offensive
language that makes them feel othered or like their right to equality is denied. For instance,
27% of women with disabilities say they regularly hear demeaning remarks about them or
people like them at work, compared to 16% of women and 11% of men overall.27 Several
studies have shown that overt and covert discrimination, like offensive jokes or derogatory
language, can lead to an increased risk of depression, anxiety, and other negative health
outcomes.28

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 28

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN EVERYDAY INTERACTIONS:

I don’t often feel othered by the words my colleagues use

Listen to Deena’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”In the earlier part of my career, I was not necessarily fully
closeted, but I did not talk about being a lesbian. I think the
reason for that was I was very unsure of myself in the earlier
part of my career. As maybe you can imagine, you're trying to
establish yourself, you want credibility. I'm a woman, and I'm
blessed and cursed with a very young-looking face. I'm usually
read as the intern, even if I am, in fact, the program manager.
One thing that I think is taken for granted, and people may
not notice unless it personally affects them, is the extent to
which casual jokes or particularly gossip about LGBTQ people
happens in the workplace.”

”I remember being so disappointed, and really scared in some
of my earlier jobs, when I would hear people laughing that they
had heard one of the leads for a client was a lesbian. I heard it
as, ‘This is somebody to laugh about’, or ‘this is exciting gossip.’
I remember thinking, 'Oh, that's how you feel about people

like me.' ”The thing about being LGBTQ is, it’s not a visible
form of diversity, and unlike more casual read elements of
who we are, it’s invisible. Although this isn’t always the case,
it’s incredible the comments people will make in front of
you because they've assumed that you're straight, or they
assume that you're not LGBTQ.”

”Unfortunately, made me think differently about my
colleagues, and these colleagues later in my life, later in
my career, became really close friends. They actually had
no idea and were frankly mortified that they had ever made
these comments and jokes.”

”One thing I would say is, it's important to know how much
of a person's life experience and identity is not going to
be readily visible to you. It's not going to be readily known.
That's really why it's important to do the work on ourselves
to hopefully approach people with a greater sense of
awareness and inclusion.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 29

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

Understanding workplace inequities:

Workplace norms and expectations

Calendar

Workplace norms include everything from the way we set up our
physical workspaces, to the hours we expect our colleagues to be
available, to the software and tools we use. Because many of our
current norms were established when the workforce was primarily
made up of white, cis, straight, able-bodied men, they often prioritize
that group’s needs. This places an additional burden on those with
traditionally marginalized identities to fit in, feel comfortable, and succeed.29

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 30

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 31

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

I can use company bathrooms without stress or anxiety

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2016, 59% of respondents to the U.S. Transgender Survey said that in the
past year they avoided using a restroom because they were worried about
confrontations or other problems. Nearly one-third of respondents said they
avoided eating or drinking so they wouldn’t have to go to the bathroom.30

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 32

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

I have never declined a work social event because the building wasn’t accessible

Listen to Andraéa’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”I was working for an organization and they were
having a happy hour and actually my role at the
organization was around access and inclusion. I
made apparently the wrong assumption that when
events were being hosted, even if they were social
events, that accessibility would be considered.
There was a happy hour that some colleagues
were planning. I RSVP'd and planned to go, hadn't
thought much about it, I think, until the very last
minute. I asked about entry, because I was used
to sometimes maybe entering through a different
door or what have you.”

”It turned out that the person organizing it had
completely just forgotten to ask about accessibility. It
turned out that the location had a step. Then they were
at the last minute trying to figure out whether they
could get a ramp and what would work and all of this.
I ended up not going, and to be honest, it had little to
do with the fact that we could have found a solution.
I could have probably offered a solution, but it really
sucks to be in a workplace, especially where you've
been for a while, and you advocate for your needs and
they're still overlooked in settings that perhaps aren't
the most formal, so I decided not to go.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 33

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

I often have leftover sick days that I can use as vacation time

DID YOU KNOW?

Many chronic medical conditions require an employee to miss work—for example, to
manage pain or for medical treatment. However, depending on their company’s paid
leave policy, the employee may not have the flexibility to get the care they need.
One study found that employees with chronic diseases had an absentee rate that
was more than six times the rate of employees without a chronic illness.31 And this
can affect a large percentage of employees, since 68% of adults between the ages
of 45 and 64 are living with at least one chronic condition.32

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 34

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

I have never had to disclose an invisible disability to get the
support I need at work

DID YOU KNOW?

When workplaces don't offer a basic level of flexibility and accommodation,
employees with invisible disabilities, such as ADHD or a chronic illness, may be forced
to reveal their disability in order to get the accommodation they need. And this may
create further issues for them: research shows that when an employee with an invisible
disability is granted an accommodation (like being able to begin work an hour later
to accommodate the effects of a medication), coworkers may react negatively to what
they see as special treatment—and that might result in fewer people disclosing their
disabilities.33 But when workplaces establish flexibility as the norm, it is less likely that
those who need accommodations will feel othered or put on the spot.

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 35

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

I can take paid time off to care for someone without worrying
that people will think I'm not committed to my job

Listen to Daisy’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”Having to worry whether I can take my kid to an orthodontist appointment
or miss a meeting or miss a presentation that I may not be delivering on is
a constant worrying feeling that mothers have, that parents have, and that
caregivers have. I wish I didn't have to worry about taking that extra hour or
two hours to take care of my child, but I do.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 36

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN WORKPLACE NORMS AND EXPECTATIONS:

I don’t have to take PTO days to celebrate my religious holidays

Listen to Rima’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”I am Muslim, and I'm practicing, which means that every year for around 30 days I practice Ramadan.
Ramadan is a month where Muslims fast from food and water from sunrise to sunset for 30 days straight.
Given that there are over 4 million Muslims in the U.S. you would think that certain programs would at
least acknowledge that this thing exists for people for 30 days, but that has not been my experience.”

”I have had no shortage of academic and professional experiences that literally fell right in that month.
One of my first professional experiences coming out of college was there was a summer training
required, a mandatory summer training that fell right during Ramadan. While I'm not expecting
them to just completely change their plans for the subset of people, I was expecting some sort of
acknowledgment of the fact that not everyone is going to be able to fulfill this mandatory experience
the same way, or that maybe some accommodations should be made to the people who are literally not
eating or drinking water during working hours.”

”There just didn't seem to be much accommodation for that at all.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 37

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

Understanding workplace inequities:

Hiring

Résumé

We all want hiring to be fair and equitable. But job candidates with
less privilege face barriers and biases that make it harder for them to
get noticed.34 Even when they do land an interview, they may not be
evaluated fairly—they’re often held to higher standards and have to
work harder to prove their competence.35

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 38

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 39

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

When I apply for a job, I’m pretty sure my name won’t
hurt my chances of getting an interview

DID YOU KNOW?

  • In one study, Black applicants needed to show an average of eight more years of
    experience to receive as many callbacks as those with white-sounding names.36

  • Applicants with white-sounding names like Emily and Greg were 50% more likely to be
    called to interview than those with Black-sounding names like Jamal and Lakisha.

  • Another study found that 21% of Asian applicants who removed any references to
    their race from their résumés (like changing their name from ”Lei” to ”Luke”) received
    callbacks, compared to 11.5% who didn’t remove any racial clues or references.37

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 40

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

I don’t usually worry that wearing a symbol of my religion or
culture to an interview will decrease my chances of getting a job

DID YOU KNOW?

Visible symbols of some religions can trigger discrimination. For example, one study
found that Muslim women applicants who wear a hijab to an interview are less likely
to be offered jobs than Muslim women candidates who don’t.38

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 41

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

I’ve never hesitated to include an award, club, or affinity group on
my résumé because it reveals my sexual orientation or gender

DID YOU KNOW?

  • 1 in 5 LGBTQ+ people says they have experienced discrimination based on their
    sexual orientation or gender identity when applying for jobs.39

  • When a woman has something on her résumé that indicates she’s LGBTQ+, like
    volunteering for an advocacy group, she is 30% less likely to get a callback.40

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 42

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

I’ve never hesitated to include an award, club, or affinity group on my
résumé because it reveals my sexual orientation or gender

Listen to B’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”When I am applying for a new job, I am debating
about whether or not to include a lot of my
experiences that have to do with mentoring trans
youth or planning a trans conference or adding
my pronouns to my résumé because I'm not sure
if that will turn my potential future employer off
from not wanting to hire me.”

”If it feels inappropriate to include those things,
if I am sharing too much by saying them, or if the

person looking at the piece of paper actually won't
even know what those things mean, then there would
be an inherent disconnect that I won't even get to
explain. Ultimately, I decided that I want to put those
things on my résumé because if that's an employer's
reaction, then I don't think I want to work at that
place, and I want to work somewhere that I get to be
myself.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 43

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

When I interview for a job, I don’t have to ask questions in advance to
make sure the building or video conference software is accessible to
people with disabilities

Listen to Andraéa’s experience

TRANSCRIPT:

”I am a wheelchair user, a power wheelchair user, and
so there is no space that I ever enter that I don't have to
think about accessibility. That includes jobs, interviews,
and I have had multiple experiences where that's been
a concern. Specifically I can think of a time when I was
applying for a long-distance job in a different city and
I was trying to even figure out whether I wanted to
disclose, because as a chair user a lot of times I'm used
to rolling into a room and people see the disability, see
my chair, but when I was applying long-distance that
wasn't the case.”

”I was really concerned. I had to spend some time doing
research on the building, where it was in the city and how
I would get there and all of those pieces. If there was a
button that I could use to get in the door, or if there was
a security guard at the door, would I be able to get up to
whatever floor it is and all of that. Access is a huge thing
and it can even be a deterrent for me. There've been jobs
that I have not been able to apply to simply because of the
fact that they weren't in locations that I ultimately would be
able to access for employment.”

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 44

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INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY

INEQUITY IN HIRING:

One or both of my parents graduated from college

DID YOU KNOW?

In one study, men were less likely to receive callbacks when hiring managers
knew that they received financial aid or were first-generation college graduates.
Men who participated in activities associated with higher class status, such as
sailing or classical music, received the most callbacks.41

©2021 LeanIn.Org, LLC 45